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Looking for a technique

Posted: Tue Aug 27, 2019 1:53 pm
by rjk40
Hi Gentlemen,

I'm in the process of getting the sheet metal on my 1975 860GT painted. As most of you know, removing the front fender ("mudguard") necessitates squeezing the two fender/mudguard mounting tabs/tangs off of the mounting studs (4 on each side) towards each other enough to clear the studs. While I have been able to do that successfully, I am going to want to be very careful on re-assembly to not scar the new paint on the mounting studs, and that requires a pretty significant squeeze on those tabs/tangs.

If any of you can provide a technique to do this without scratching the new paint, I will be most thankful. Else, I will have to resort to fighting with the studs to get them unscrewed from the "wheel carrier" (as listed in the parts manual), so that I then have the clearance.

Thanks in advance.

Regards,
Richard :*<:

Re: Looking for a technique

Posted: Tue Aug 27, 2019 3:47 pm
by BevHevSteve
tilt fender and get 1 side in place

now squeeze the other side in and over the studs

You can also use tape to protect the paint of course

Re: Looking for a technique

Posted: Fri Sep 06, 2019 12:04 pm
by rjk40
Thanks, Steve,

I don't trust myself to not let go of the mudguard while it is under tension when remounting it, so I chose to unscrew the studs using the tried, and occasionally successful, method of using two nuts with an external toothed lockwasher between them, and then replace the studs through the repainted mudguard holes once it is in position.

I sprayed a bit of easing oil (Blaster is my fave) onto the studs, gave them an oblique tap with a hammer, then I used the tried, and occasionally successful, method of removing the studs by threading on two nuts with an external toothed lockwasher between them.

Re: Looking for a technique

Posted: Fri Sep 06, 2019 12:16 pm
by rjk40
Hi again,

I hit the "submit" button before I was finished with the stud removal post, so here's the rest of the info:

All studs came out with no stubbornness or damage, which is good, because the studs, Ducati part # 0684.37.583, are apparently made of the rare element "unobtainium", as I could not find any online in the usual places

Each stud has a flat end and a rounded end; the flat end goes down into the hole in the "wheel carrier" , and the rounded end protrudes. The difference between the two ends is subtle but noticeable.

Once the mudguard is in place, there will still be JUST enough thread to get two nuts (but no lockwasher) onto the stud to secure them in the wheel carrier.

Re: Looking for a technique

Posted: Fri Sep 06, 2019 1:37 pm
by 81mhr900ss
A smart move. My MHR has bolts from the factory. After painting my front mudguard and giving the paint a long cure time, I waxed the guard but added a lot more on the sides that would be pressed up against the lower fork legs to do my best to prevent the new paint from sticking to the fork legs.

Re: Looking for a technique

Posted: Sat Sep 07, 2019 10:52 am
by rjk40
Thanks, 81.

I've been toying with the idea of putting a washer on both sides of the mudguard, to give just a teeny bit of distance between the mudguard sheet metal and the wheel carrier. As of now, I cannot think of a reason not to. Thin washers are readily available, and the smallest gap would likely solve the potential of the paint sticking to the wheel carrier.

Re: Looking for a technique

Posted: Fri Sep 13, 2019 12:01 pm
by andybaggies
I waxed the guard
I've been toying with the idea of putting a washer
I've just had my frame wet painted and the advised method to prevent scratching/sticking was to use red rubber grease, as used for brake caliper maintenance, or nylon washers.

Andy B