oil filter for beveldrive

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anatak
Cucciolo - the Lil Pup
Posts: 15
Joined: Wed Mar 18, 2009 10:43 pm

oil filter for beveldrive

Post by anatak » Fri Feb 12, 2010 6:39 am

Does anybody know if there are some Japanese bikes that use the same oil filter as the Ducati Beveldrives ?
I am looking to buy some filters locally but at the closest shop they didn't know the filter type for a beveldrive engine (too old I guess)

I was told that the oil filter is the same as some Japanese 4 cyl bikes but don't know exactly what type.

thanks for reading

Lumpy
SD900 Darmah
Posts: 327
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2007 5:49 am

Oil filters

Post by Lumpy » Fri Feb 12, 2010 7:06 am

Kawasaki filter - #16099-004 - or after market part # HIFLOFILTRO HF 123 - readily available and seals on the shaft, not on the washer and top cap

Have`nt tried these out myself. Thats a copy and paste off Ducatimechanicca.com

anatak
Cucciolo - the Lil Pup
Posts: 15
Joined: Wed Mar 18, 2009 10:43 pm

thanks

Post by anatak » Fri Feb 12, 2010 4:18 pm

will try to find those around here and see if it is easy to fit.

Peter Mille
750 SS Greenframe - the holy grail
Posts: 500
Joined: Fri Aug 13, 2004 2:12 am
Location: The Netherlands, Europe.

Post by Peter Mille » Fri Feb 12, 2010 11:57 pm

At least two, maybe three different kind of (spin-on) oilfilters were used on the bevel Ducati's.
What bevel are you talking about anyway?

Grover
Parallel Twin
Posts: 102
Joined: Wed Jun 21, 2006 3:50 am
Location: Grafton NSW Australia

Filters

Post by Grover » Sat Feb 13, 2010 1:33 pm

Im with Lumpy on this one, HF123 or the Champion brand No:is X331, these are not spin on though.
The older we get, the more toys we collect!!!

anatak
Cucciolo - the Lil Pup
Posts: 15
Joined: Wed Mar 18, 2009 10:43 pm

Post by anatak » Sat Feb 13, 2010 10:43 pm

sorry forgot to tell that I was looking for filters for 1976 900 SS and 1981 MHR 900 squarecase

I ll give the kawasaki filters a try since they are locally available. Now just waiting untill it stops raining

Thank you again for the help

anatak
Cucciolo - the Lil Pup
Posts: 15
Joined: Wed Mar 18, 2009 10:43 pm

oil plug metric size ?

Post by anatak » Sun Feb 21, 2010 5:42 am

hello
I tried to change the oil of the MHR 900 today but ran into a problem.

I tried to loosen the oil plug with a 21 metric spanner but it slips since spanner can not go over the whole plug because of the shape of the carter.
I didn't get a 21 socket plug because I thought I would not be able to put a plug and torque wrench over the plug with the exhaust being in the way.

Is 21 metric the correct size or is it some arcane imperial size that I need ?

and on an other note does anybody know the correct torque values for tightening the plug afterward ? Or even better a manual with the common torque values for the beveldrive 900 square case engine ?

thank you very much

Peter Mille
750 SS Greenframe - the holy grail
Posts: 500
Joined: Fri Aug 13, 2004 2:12 am
Location: The Netherlands, Europe.

Post by Peter Mille » Sun Feb 21, 2010 7:16 am

I run a Conti 2into1 exhaust, which I have to remove to get access the the oildrain plug.
I use a 21 socket plug without problems to remove the oilplug.
I use common sense to tighten the plug afterwards, don't know if there's an official factory torque setting for it...??

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Craig in France
Cagiva Gran Canyon
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Joined: Tue Mar 23, 2004 3:58 pm
Location: Montpellier, France

Re: oil plug metric size ?

Post by Craig in France » Sun Feb 21, 2010 10:53 am

anatak wrote: I tried to loosen the oil plug with a 21 metric spanner <snip>
Don't. Use a socket and try to 'shock' the plug loose, i.e. don't apply gradual pressure. The metal of the bolt head is soft and will readily round off if you try to loosen it slowly - especially if you use a spanner.
anatak wrote: <snip> ... with the exhaust being in the way
Take it off, if necessary - sorry!
anatak wrote:Is 21 metric the correct size or is it some arcane imperial size that I need ?
:-D . It's metric - can't remember what size. The only imperial fastening on a Ducati is the pillion foot peg nut, for reasons never really understood ... (oh, and all Brembo components which are also imperial altho' always translated to metric).
anatak wrote: ... does anybody know the correct torque values for tightening the plug afterward ?
This is kinda the wrong approach. This fastening isn't stressed or 'subject to vibration', so a torque value isn't really what you're after. And, as mentioned above, the bolt head is soft, as is the material into which it is threaded. So either one or other is easily stripped by over-tightening :shock: .... This, you do not want ;) .

What does matter is the condition of the sealing washer. If the one you have is copper, anneal it and re-fit. If it's aluminium, replace it with new. (You may get away with re-using it, but it's your call. For me, it's a 'No Brainer'). Then, just nip the bolt up tight - and not super tight, neither!
anatak wrote: Or even better a manual with the common torque values for the beveldrive 900 square case engine ?
Ducati were not great at listing out torque values - they are there, but you often have to work thru the pages of the workshop manual to find them. But, that said, here are some basic values from the Dramah manual:
6mm: 5.8 - 7.2 lb/ft (0,8 - 1,0 Kgm)
8mm: 10.9 - 14.5 lb/ft (1,5 - 2,0 Kgm)
10mm: 14.5 - 18.1 lb/ft (2,0 - 2,5 Kgm)

As you'll see, they are pretty much the standard values for 8.8 grade steel metric bolts.

HTH

Craig

anatak
Cucciolo - the Lil Pup
Posts: 15
Joined: Wed Mar 18, 2009 10:43 pm

thank you

Post by anatak » Sun Feb 21, 2010 2:44 pm

Thanks

wdietz186
Cagiva Alazzura
Posts: 703
Joined: Sun Sep 10, 2006 5:40 pm

Post by wdietz186 » Sun Feb 21, 2010 4:19 pm

I've used a 13/16 sparkplug socket on my bevels. As to torque" snug" is sufficent.

Lumpy
SD900 Darmah
Posts: 327
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2007 5:49 am

edited

Post by Lumpy » Sun Feb 21, 2010 6:03 pm

Edited, now i can`t make it go away. Better with a ball pain than a computer
Last edited by Lumpy on Sun Feb 21, 2010 6:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Lumpy
SD900 Darmah
Posts: 327
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2007 5:49 am

oil plug

Post by Lumpy » Sun Feb 21, 2010 6:11 pm

As wdietz186 says a 13/16 plug socket does the job admirably and the weapon of choice since I misplaced my 21mm socket. Another tip that is worth remembering is that if the hex on the bolt head is a bit rounded or, as in this case it`s a soft material, use a single hex socket. That is a socket that has only 6 straight sides in the opening, rather than a double hex which resembles a star type arrangment. Reason being that a double hex will make only point contact, a single hex makes contact on the flanks and will give a much stronger grip and will not be as prone to roll off, particularly if the head is damaged. To be honest it makes me wonder why they manufacture double hex at all these days since the ratchet mechanisms are so fine these days anyway. I always choose a single hex socket set when purchasing. I go with a fibre washer on my oil drain. I find that they seal well with minimal torque. As for what torque, tighten her till she strips the thread and then back it out half a turn!!!! No, just joking, little engineering humour for you there. You can always go a little tighter if she weeps but it`s tough kicking your own arse when you`ve stripped her out. Err on the side of safety. Don`t forget aluminium is a soft material and the drain hole is in a sow of a place to helicoil or repair.
While we`re on the subject of damaged bolt removal, torx or star bits as some people know them are exellent to have on hand to remove damaged cap screws (allan head bolts). You know the ones I`m sure. Some butcher has tried to take it out with the wrong size allen key, or with a damaged allen key, and rounded off the internal hex. Simply get a torx bit of a similar size and gently tap it into the rounded hex till it bottoms out. The tapping tends to help loosen the screw also. Then just put the ratchet on her and wind her out. Works a treat.

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